wesfincher:

The Thin Red Line - directed by Terrence Malick (1998)

This great evil. Where does it come from? How’d it steal into the world? What seed, what root did it grow from? Who’s doin’ this? Who’s killin’ us? Robbing us of life and light. Mockin’ us with the sight of what we might’ve known. Does our ruin benefit the earth? Does it help the grass to grow, the sun to shine?

(via andreii-tarkovsky)

MY THOUGHTS ON DIVERGENT (Spoiler-free):

"The future belongs to those who know where they belong."

Neil Burger’s 2014 first installation of the film series adapted from Veronica Roth’s set of novels, Divergent, has proven to be the underdog in the current market. While the first Hunger Games of 2012 scored a 7.3 out of 10 on IMDB, Divergent has swung in a 7.6 (remember these are user-based). While the film has received mixed reviews from other sites and critics, (www.rottentomatoes.com, etc.) it has done surprisingly well in theaters and received strong positive feedback from audiences across the nation. I myself, admittedly, went to see the movie in theaters with extremely low expectations. I am not a reader of the books, and entered the theater with ambiguous feelings, but, hey, it was college night and my ticket was only $3.50, so why not. So, i’ll put my two cents into the pot. As a person who enjoys and appreciates film, I enjoyed the aesthetics of this film; the cinematography, scope, and many visual aspects. I wasn’t presented with anything particularly ground-breaking, but I did notice and appreciate the visual efforts put in from director Neil Burger and cinematographer Alwin H. Küchler. On the same note, the writing (although I’m ignorant of the correlation as it relates to the book) was better than I could have expected. Yes, there are the “romantic comedy moments” you’ll generally find in any other similar film series (Harry Potter, The Hunger Games, Twilight) that will be cheesy, but yet, you’ll find that your attention is being held. Shailene Woodley puts forth a fantastic lead performance that I feel will only develop and improve alongside the progression of the series. From the point of view of any average movie-goer, I can say I was entertained the entire movie, and it was thrilling, and emotional, and intriguing from start to finish. The movie satisfies the action and adventure genres while providing a refreshing sci-fi environment where all of the intertwining drama can occur. While any film series struggles in quality at the hands of films with different systems of creative control, I can say that Divergent was a great first installment, and that I’ll be waiting eagerly for the next film in the series to come to a theater near me.

MY THOUGHTS ON DIVERGENT (Spoiler-free):

"The future belongs to those who know where they belong."


Neil Burger’s 2014 first installation of the film series adapted from Veronica Roth’s set of novels, Divergent, has proven to be the underdog in the current market. While the first Hunger Games of 2012 scored a 7.3 out of 10 on IMDB, Divergent has swung in a 7.6 (remember these are user-based). While the film has received mixed reviews from other sites and critics, (www.rottentomatoes.com, etc.) it has done surprisingly well in theaters and received strong positive feedback from audiences across the nation. I myself, admittedly, went to see the movie in theaters with extremely low expectations. I am not a reader of the books, and entered the theater with ambiguous feelings, but, hey, it was college night and my ticket was only $3.50, so why not. So, i’ll put my two cents into the pot. As a person who enjoys and appreciates film, I enjoyed the aesthetics of this film; the cinematography, scope, and many visual aspects. I wasn’t presented with anything particularly ground-breaking, but I did notice and appreciate the visual efforts put in from director Neil Burger and cinematographer Alwin H. Küchler. On the same note, the writing (although I’m ignorant of the correlation as it relates to the book) was better than I could have expected. Yes, there are the “romantic comedy moments” you’ll generally find in any other similar film series (Harry Potter, The Hunger Games, Twilight) that will be cheesy, but yet, you’ll find that your attention is being held. Shailene Woodley puts forth a fantastic lead performance that I feel will only develop and improve alongside the progression of the series. From the point of view of any average movie-goer, I can say I was entertained the entire movie, and it was thrilling, and emotional, and intriguing from start to finish. The movie satisfies the action and adventure genres while providing a refreshing sci-fi environment where all of the intertwining drama can occur. While any film series struggles in quality at the hands of films with different systems of creative control, I can say that Divergent was a great first installment, and that I’ll be waiting eagerly for the next film in the series to come to a theater near me.


brightwalldarkroom:

"The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford is as much about the incalculable weight of this mythology as it is the titular deed. The act which made Ford famous rings through the violence of so many other lonely, troubled young men hopelessly misled by the pre-packaged dreams of the new century. It’s about the failure of fiction to console, to ever adequately prepare us for the harsh complexities and contradictions of the real world.
The film is a slow, thoughtful piece, a Western that’s also about Westerns. Any film about Jesse James’ retirement is bound to be something of a winding-down, and as such this is a genre piece which features a single robbery and only one real gun fight. The latter is so short and absurd it could be hilarious if it weren’t so weirdly plausible — it, like most of the violence, is blunt, intimate, ugly, always at stark odds with the rest of the imagery. Regular Coen Brothers cinematographer Roger Deakins has made perhaps his most beautiful film here, reminiscent in many ways of Kubrick’s Barry Lyndon and the films of Terrence Malick, and emulating from time to time the photography of the late nineteenth-century with a languorous, over-exposed look, a subtle blurring around the edges of the shot.”
— Patrick Vickers ("Blessed Are the Meek", Issue #10, March 2014)
(To read the rest of this essay, download the Bright Wall/Dark Room app to your iPhone or iPad for free, or purchase a copy of this issue for $1 to receive immediate access to the entire issue online.)

brightwalldarkroom:

"The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford is as much about the incalculable weight of this mythology as it is the titular deed. The act which made Ford famous rings through the violence of so many other lonely, troubled young men hopelessly misled by the pre-packaged dreams of the new century. It’s about the failure of fiction to console, to ever adequately prepare us for the harsh complexities and contradictions of the real world.

The film is a slow, thoughtful piece, a Western that’s also about Westerns. Any film about Jesse James’ retirement is bound to be something of a winding-down, and as such this is a genre piece which features a single robbery and only one real gun fight. The latter is so short and absurd it could be hilarious if it weren’t so weirdly plausible — it, like most of the violence, is blunt, intimate, ugly, always at stark odds with the rest of the imagery. Regular Coen Brothers cinematographer Roger Deakins has made perhaps his most beautiful film here, reminiscent in many ways of Kubrick’s Barry Lyndon and the films of Terrence Malick, and emulating from time to time the photography of the late nineteenth-century with a languorous, over-exposed look, a subtle blurring around the edges of the shot.”

— Patrick Vickers ("Blessed Are the Meek", Issue #10, March 2014)


(To read the rest of this essay, download the Bright Wall/Dark Room app to your iPhone or iPad for free, or purchase a copy of this issue for $1 to receive immediate access to the entire issue online.)

iwanttobelikearollingstone:

Scorsese on the importance of visual literacy.

(via oldfilmsflicker)

cinefamily:

Velvet Goldmine (UK - USA, 1998)

April 3: Dress Up w/ VELVET GOLDMINE

asker

Anonymous asked: do you think wes anderson is overrated?

andreii-tarkovsky:

I wouldn’t go that far and use the word ”overrated” because I know people tend to interpret it as a total dislike or disrespectful towards the person and I don’t feel that when it comes to Wes Anderson. I love his earlier movies so much. I haven’t enjoyed his most recent films (I haven’t seen The Grand Budapest Hotel) but I love his aesthetic, to me his films are just so beautiful, sadly there’s nothing else beyond that pretty imagery. 

I completely agree.

Wes Anderson // Centered from kogonada on Vimeo.

dadsamoviecritic:

I’m down for a cerebral film tonight ….’Mulholland Dr.’ (2001)  

dadsamoviecritic:

I’m down for a cerebral film tonight ….’Mulholland Dr.’ (2001)  

This is a short, intense, brilliant film called “ABE.”
It’s been out in the world for almost a year, and I’ve watched it numbers of times since, finding something different each time to appreciate. Filmmaker Rob McKlellan gives us a new kind of obsessor, providing us with a non-human Hannibal Lecter who shows nothing but humanity.
Take about 7 minutes of your time, and see one of the countless directions that film could be taken in this generation.

 "When I looked into his eyes I thought I saw recognition. Now I know. You fake it. If you think you’re supposed to recognize somebody you, you just pretend. You bluff it to get a pat on the head from the doctors. You bluff it to seem less like a freak."


    British director Christopher Nolan (noted for The Dark Knight, The Dark Knight Rises, Batman Begins, Inception, and more) paired up with his brother Jonathan to bring the story, “Memento Mori” to life in Memento, “the film filmed backward.” This modern film noir is threaded together outside of a progressive chronological order as Guy Pearce leads the cast as Leonard, a man suffering from a rare type of amnesia, seeking out to avenge the rape and murder of his wife.
    The film itself provides an entirely new vibe to the older film noir movies involving memory loss and mystery, while still providing a satisfying touch of charm and irony throughout the plot.
Although Memento is often a film that leaves my heart heavy, I would recommend anyone who claims to love film both with modernism and nostalgia to watch and appreciate this film. 



 "We all need mirrors to remind ourselves who we are. I’m no different."

"When I looked into his eyes I thought I saw recognition. Now I know. You fake it. If you think you’re supposed to recognize somebody you, you just pretend. You bluff it to get a pat on the head from the doctors. You bluff it to seem less like a freak."


British director Christopher Nolan (noted for The Dark Knight, The Dark Knight Rises, Batman Begins, Inception, and more) paired up with his brother Jonathan to bring the story, “Memento Mori” to life in Memento, “the film filmed backward.” This modern film noir is threaded together outside of a progressive chronological order as Guy Pearce leads the cast as Leonard, a man suffering from a rare type of amnesia, seeking out to avenge the rape and murder of his wife.
The film itself provides an entirely new vibe to the older film noir movies involving memory loss and mystery, while still providing a satisfying touch of charm and irony throughout the plot.
Although Memento is often a film that leaves my heart heavy, I would recommend anyone who claims to love film both with modernism and nostalgia to watch and appreciate this film.

"We all need mirrors to remind ourselves who we are. I’m no different."


UK poster for “UNDER THE SKIN” with Scarlett Johansson

UK poster for “UNDER THE SKIN” with Scarlett Johansson

(via suzybishop)